Nick Earle is a Canadian guitarist and singer-songwriter from St. John’s, Newfoundland. Nick began his career in the music industry as one half of the nationally recognized duo “Earle and Coffin.” He is a 2-time Canadian Folk Music award winner and a 5-time MusicNL award recipient. While celebrating the success of Earle & Coffin, Nick has now stepped out into a new musical endeavor along with his band “The Reckless Hearts.” Together, they channel a vintage style of Blues & Rock ‘n’ Roll which is garnering them attention nationwide. Their debut record is set to release on April 24th, 2020 as a follow up to Nick Earle’s 2019 release Breaking New Ground.

2016 JUNO WINNER for Children’s Album of the Year, The Swinging Belles, a swing band for kids from St. John’s, NL, are intent on getting both kids and adults to kick up their heels and have a swinging good time with the whole family!

The Swinging Belles feature child educators and performers Laura Winter and Erin Power joined by guitarist extraordinaire Duane Andrews. This show is all about getting kids and parents out to have a dance and enjoy some swing country and jazz…kid style. As primary school teachers, both Laura and Erin know first hand the joy that kids feel when they can boogie to some good time music, and as parents, Duane and Erin know the importance of enjoying the music that our kids are listening to! The show is packed with music, interactive storytelling and dancing…lots of dancing!

Newfoundland has a storied history of stunning songwriters, poets and players. Over the course of the last decade The Once have writ and knit themselves into that story.
Within the nine songs on their new album Time Enough, The Once offer some of the most vulnerable and honest material of their career. The up-tempo album opener, “I Can’t Live Without You,” reflects on women battling with self-image issues and offers wisened words to be the positive change in their own lives. The gritty guitar driven “Before The Fall” succumbs to the notion that we must accept our past and use those memories to grow. Riff rocker “Any Other Way” reflects the fact that true love accepts us at our worst but insists we do the work to be our best selves to keep it together.
On this, their fourth studio album, the band stays true to the root strength of their harmony driven sound, while extending the borders into fresh yet familiar territory. They craft a sonically understated, but emotionally fulsome sound that accomplishes what they’ve always done so well: stun listeners with what Amelia Curran calls “perfect vocal harmonies, thick enough to stand on.”

“We approached Time Enough with an open heart and on open mind. We composed apart and came together to Once-up the new material,” says lead singer Geraldine Hollett of the band’s writing process. “We are pretty tough customers so it was scary bringing so much guts to the table, but over the years we have earned and accepted one another’s trust. This album is special because of it.”

The story of The Once is one of growth, propelled by the rare chemistry that comes from a decade of writing and touring together. Their songs have been placed in international film and television, they have YouTube videos with millions of hits, and there’s a trail of trophy nominations and wins from the East Coast Music Awards, the Canadian Folk Awards, and the JUNO Awards in their wake.

Since first hitting the road in 2009, The Once has earned one of the most loyal followings in the country. Ask their fans why they love the band and watch their eyes widen as the words flow. It becomes clear that The Once ain’t regular folk. They’ve built something unique within their genre, and something rare within the fan base that keeps them growing and going strong and they do not take that fan base for granted. “We give all we got to them because we know we can’t do what we want to do if they’re not with us,” says Hollett of those who have shown endless support for the group. It was this resonance with fans that launched their career and it is this deep relationship that continues to inspire the band to travel new paths, explore new territory, and create new music.

Geraldine Hollett’s voice is a large part of the band’s ethereal sound, and there is nowhere it would sit better than in between the rhythmic and supportive voices of Phil Churchill and Andrew Dale, and the lush soundscapes they build. The trio’s instrumentation and vocals meld together like gold, building something stronger together than any one songwriter could muster alone. Their harmonies grab you by the heart, and their music melts what’s left of it.

Building on the wave of creative energy that defined their last album, Time Enough is a striking and subtle sea change for the band. Dive in, get lost, click repeat.

Silver Wolf Band is a four-piece Indigenous folk pop rock band from Happy Valley Goose Bay, Labrador. Lively, engaging and self-assured performances of honest and sincere lyrical music is what has made Silver Wolf Band one of the most in-demand music groups from Labrador. Their music is piano driven and rich in harmony. Lyrically, their songs are shaped and informed by family, community, love, and their home land itself. Both their debut EP and their first full length album saw them award nominations for Pop Recording Of The Year (Music PEI, 2011), Rock Artist of the Year (Music NL, 2018) and First Light Indigenous Artist/Group of the Year (Music NL, 2019).

With every performance, Silver Wolf Band offer their audience an uplifting and enthusiastic performance of original music, along with their renditions of popular favourites by celebrated Labrador songwriters and musicians. But what’s more, Silver Wolf Band pepper their performances with knowledge, personal histories and cultural lessons from the ‘Big Land’ of Labrador.

In recent years, they’ve been invited to perform at The Newfoundland & Labrador Folk Festival (St. John’s, NL), Northern Lights Arts Symposium (Ottawa, ON), the ECMA Artist Showcase (Charlottetown, PEI), Petapan First Light Indigenous Arts Symposium (St. John’s, NL), Trails, Tales and Tunes Festival (Norris Point, NL), Spirit Song Festival (St. John’s, NL), Labrador Winter Games Opening Ceremonies (Goose Bay, NL) and countless stages and festivals throughout Labrador.

Silver Wolf Band is Jamie Jackman (guitar, vocals), Matthew Barrett (piano, keyboards), Justin Jackman (drums, percussion), and Brandon Pardy (bass guitar). They are currently gearing up for the autumn 2020 release of their second full length album.

Truly, the musicians of Silver Wolf Band are warm, kind, humble, talented and entertaining ambassadors of the Big Land. For more information, or to book them, please visit www.silverwolfband.com

Natasha Blackwood is a singer, multi-instrumentalist and composer based in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador. She is well known for her role in ECMA award-winning band Eastern Owl, and her work as a large-ensemble writer for choral and instrumental groups across Canada. Natasha’s debut solo album, “Ease Back” is a concept album that explores the stages of grief with lush arrangements, thoughtful poetry, and catchy jazz-pop writing. The album was released on March 14, 2020, on the very first day of the provincial shutdown due to COVID-19. Although the release concert and subsequent events were all cancelled, the album was released to critical acclaim and community celebration. The album went to #1 at Fred’s Records, was featured on CBC and CHMR, and received rave reviews. Natasha’s first performance of these songs was a livestream solo concert for the National Arts Centre’s #canadaperforms series in May, and this year’s Folk Fest is her very first performance with her band.

Fergus has been involved with the traditional music scene for the past 15+ years and performs regularly on accordion and concertina. Fergus is a member of The Freels and hosts a regular session at O’reilly’s Pub every week.

Fergus est un musician professionnnel depuis 15+ ans. Il joue l’accordion et le concertina. Il est l’animateur d’un ensemble de musique chez O’Reilly’s Pub

While pursuing separate solo careers, Sandy and Anita have been performing together sporadically since 1969. Their repertoire contains traditional folk material and contemporary folk material in several languages. Sandy is acclaimed for his many and varied guitar stylings, Anita for her warm voice.

With infectious melodies, toe-tapping rhythms, and a story to tell, Sherman Downey presents his craft with a charm and poignancy that leaves a lasting impression.
After releasing his 2009 debut “Honey For Bees”, Sherman took his energetic performances to stages ranging from the Vancouver Olympics to Australia’s Woodford Folk Festival, earning international radio play. His highly anticipated second release “The Sun In Your Eyes” was awarded MusicNL’s ‘Pop/Rock Recording of the Year’ and earned him Newfoundland and Labrador’s ‘SOCAN Songwriter of the Year’ distinction. The album’s first single ‘Thick as Thieves’ won CBC’s inaugural Searchlight Prize and ‘Canada’s Best New Artist’ accolade.

As work begins on his third album, Sherman Downey continues to craft songs that are both whimsical and heartfelt; performing them with unabashed Honesty.

Rosemary Lawton, 2019 MusicNL Celtic/Traditional Artist of the year winner, 2019 ECMA Roots/Traditional Album of the Year nominee, is an up-and-coming force within the Newfoundland music scene.

Her music is a hybrid of both classical and traditional genres. There is an underlying hint of classical influence in her unique arrangements of both traditional songs and her original compositions. Her voice is reminiscent of the high soprano Celtic singing of Ireland but with a punch.

Rosemary is helping to preserve Newfoundland’s rich tradition by collecting, recording, and performing Newfoundland traditional music.

In her new albums “Untamed,” “Fierce,” and her brand new song book “Resilience,” Rosemary Lawton explores traditional Newfoundland and Labrador songs that focus on tales of empowering women. These songs prove that people hundreds of years ago imagined women breaking boundaries, and leaving behind the gender norms of the time. At the time, these songs acted as wishes for the future. Now they are windows to the past yet they are still relevant today. These songs are culturally and historically relevant to Newfoundland and Labrador’s past and need to be shared with this new generation of Newfoundlanders.